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Paleo Profile: The Crown Tooth

Original story at Scientific American Blog Network• 7 mentions • 2 months ago

Scientific American Blog Network 2 months ago

 
Baleen whales used to have teeth. Paleontologists have known this for decades now, pulling one grinning mysticete after another from strata all over the world. But when did the ancestors of today's minkes and humpbacks make the switch from chomping their food to straining the seas? A new fossil whale found in the 30 million year old rock of South Carolina offers some new clues. Up to now, there have been two competing hypotheses for how filter feeding evolved among the mysticete whales. One line of argument suggested that ancestral baleen whales were suction feeders and that this led to ...
 
 
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What they're saying:

17 Jul
Scientific American @sciam
RT @Laelaps: Early baleen whales used teeth to start sieving the seas. @sciam @sciamblogs https://t.co/OiRI0S5ZsW
17 Jul
Brian Switek @Laelaps
Early baleen whales used teeth to start sieving the seas. @sciam @sciamblogs https://t.co/OiRI0S5ZsW
16 Jul
EagleStar.NET @EagleStarNET
Paleo Profile: The Crown Tooth: A 30-million-year-old whale reveals how filter feeding came before baleen -- R.. https://t.co/9oS2hgxR8a
16 Jul
Nick Chater @nick_chater
Paleo Profile: The Crown Tooth https://t.co/3NzdvJe6ef #EdChat
14 Jul
Laurell K. Hamilton @LKHamilton
RT @carlzimmer: The evolution of whales keeps filling in, as @Laelaps explains https://t.co/Ws7jgbJSN4
14 Jul
Carl Zimmer @carlzimmer
The evolution of whales keeps filling in, as @Laelaps explains https://t.co/Ws7jgbJSN4