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Waste Heat From Cities May Be Altering Weather Patterns

Original story at Climate Central• 2 mentions • 1 year ago

Climate Central 1 year ago

 
An independent organization of leading scientists and journalists researching and reporting the facts about our changing climate and its impact on the American public.Climate Central surveys and conducts scientific research on climate change and informs the public of key findings. Our scientists publish and our journalists report on climate science, energy, sea level rise . . . . Read MoreMembers of the Climate Central staff and board are among the most respected leaders in climate science. Staff members are authorities in communicating climate and weather links, sea level rise, climate . . . . Read More The carbon dioxide that belches from tailpipes and smokestacks is a proven greenhouse gas that has been driving global temperatures more or less steadily upward over the past century. But the heat that leaks directly into the environment from hot exhaust pipes, boilers and chimneys has also contributed to temperature increases in some places, according to a study published Sunday in Nature Climate Change, especially in winter— not directly, but rather because the waste heat may be altering the flow of the jet stream, and thus the way warm and cold air move around the globe. Waste heat coming from hot exhaust pipes, boilers and chimneys -- and mostly from cities like New York -- may be helping alter weather patterns.
 
 
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What they're saying:

27 Jan
Andrew Freedman @afreedma
Fascinating story on a study suggesting waste heat from cities may affect jet stream, but many unknowns remain http://t.co/QWbhGpJu #climate
27 Jan
ClimateCentral @ClimateCentral
New study shows that waste heat from cities may be altering winter weather patterns. http://t.co/b0Yi1bKg #climate